Gorse Hill Urban Botany Project – Survey #1

Beginning an urban botany project…

On March 27th, the day the clocks went forward I set out as planned to do my first survey for this urban botany project of mine. I’d put it in my diary weeks prior and decided that whatever the weather I would go out…at least for a bit.

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It was cold, wet and windy. I headed for zone 7:

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Zone 7 is the one at the top, the big one with the freight terminal and Old Trafford in. I walked to Old Trafford, passed the stadium, down the steps and onto the Bridgewater Canal tow path. The north towpath of this stretch of the canal is arguably outside the Gorse Hill boundary but for this project it is the boundary, as to exclude it would be to exclude my favorite patch of habitat in the area. This was also my reason for making it the site of my first survey. There might be lots of pavements with not much growing on to come, but the towpath was sure to get the project off to a fruitful start.

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I worked my way west, starting just to the west of the bridge which carries Sir Matt Busby Way, and covered a couple of hundred meters of the towpath embankment, recording the 30 or so species listed below…

Common name Latin name
Grey willow Salix cinerea agg
Bramble Rubus fruticosus
Great willowherb Epilobium hirsutum
Bracken Pteridium aquilinum
Common nettle Urtica dioica
Michaelmas daisy Aster novi-belgii agg
Buddleia Buddleja davidii
Broad-leaf dock Rumex obtusifolius
Herb robert Geranium robertianum
Cleavers Galium aparine
Common ragwort Senecio jacobaea
Ribwort plantain Plantago lanceolata
Great mullein Verbascum thapsus
Oxeye daisy Leucanthemum vulgare
Willow Salix spp.
Oak spp. Quercus spp.
Holly Ilex aquifolium
Fox glove Digitalis purpurea
Willowherb Epilobium spp.
Creeping buttercup Ranunculus repens
Violet Viola spp.
Common hogweed Heracleum sphondylium
Elder Sambucus nigra
Nightshade (to be confirmed) Solanum spp.
Forget-me-not  Myosotis spp.
Spanish bluebell Hyacinthoides hispanica
Groundsel Senecio vulgaris
Weld Reseda luteola
Toadflax Linaria
Moss spp. #1  Grimmia pulvinata
Petty spurge Euphorbia peplus
Colts foot Tussilago farfara
Dandelion Taraxacum agg
Daisy Bellis perennis

 

#Dandelion #BridgewaterCanal #UrbanBotany

#GreatMullien #BridgewaterCanal #UrbanBotany

#PettySpurge #BridgewaterCanal #UrbanBotany

#Weld #BridgewaterCanal #UrbanBotany

#FoxGlove #BridgewaterCanal #UrbanBotany #AwesomeSharkRuler

Grimmia pulvinata

#MichaelmasDaisy #BridgewaterCanal #UrbanBotany

So if you’re local/interested get on down there. Since that survey the bluebells have come out in flower. There is also a chunky Japanese Knotweed stem working its way up the fence at one spot now. And a patch of some rather lovely white deadnettle.

#WhiteDeadNettle #BridgewaterCanal #GorseHill #Stretford #Manchester #UrbanBotany

So far so good. I’ll add updates as I go. Feedback welcome.

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Urban Botany – A project for the coming season…

Thinking about urban botany…

Stretford in Manchester, where I live, has just the right degree of scruffiness. You can go about your business safely but it’s not so well to do that the walls and gutters have been stripped of the thin layer of soil that accumulates after autumn, and the little green things that grow there.

Back in 2013 when I was gathering data for my dissertation I had cause to cycle through Hale Barns, one of Greater Manchester’s posher corners, on my way to my survey site. As I did I would sometimes stop peddling and glide past the mansions, having a gawp, a little disappointed in myself at the twang of envy I felt. Not that I didn’t like my red brick terrace rental in Rusholme, but look at the size of those gardens, those trees, you could fit my whole place in some of the garages. But then I’d notice the walls, pavements and roads. Not a single thing lived outside the gates of those houses. It was as though someone had fastidiously swept up every last crumb of detritus, and plucked out every green shoot like an embarrassing floral mono-brow spoiling the neat and tidy face of Hale Barns.

I’ve lived in Stretford for a year now and am pleased to report there is no shortage of crud here!  I love it. I like seeing what different plants exploit what nooks and what crannies throughout the year. You get to know what’s in what garden or tree pit when you’re walking home. There’s a place on Taylor Street which I noticed early in the year had a blanket of either wild or barren strawberry growing in it. I’d glance in every time I walked past until one day, ‘there they are!’ A blanket of little strawberries. And the rosebay willowherb, and horsetail stems poking up here and there were like a calendar, growing taller each day like slow fireworks building up to the coming explosion of summer.

#HorseTails #Stretford #Manchester #UrbanFlora #Manchester

I’ve been working on my plant ID skills for a few years now and in that time I’ve wondered what my ‘interest’ would be? I like it when I meet people and they tell me they have an interest in lowland heaths or calcareous grassland or whatever. When people ask me what I like I’m never sure which habitat to say. I sometimes say woodland, but secretly think that while I like woodlands they aren’t ‘the one’. Truth is that people’s interests tend to relate to jobs they’ve had or places they live or have lived. It’s about exposure.  I live in Manchester. Big, urban Manchester. If I’m honest I suppose my interest, the one I think about most often, is in the walls, gutters and random green places in urban areas. There I said it. Ah! It feels good to have that off my chest!

Eruca vesicaria #GardenRocket #Stretford #Manchester #UrbanFlora #botany

So an idea has been brewing in the back of my mind for a little while. Since graduating last year there’s been an absence of project in my life. I thought it’d be fun to have a mini project which encouraged me do botany with a key regularly throughout the spring and summer, submit biological records to my local records center, and indulged my interest in urban botany.

#Dandelions #BridgewaterCanal #Stretford #Manchester #UrbanFlora #botany

The area of Stretford I live in is called Gorse Hill. As it happens Gorse Hill has a bit of a buzz about it. There’s a project called Gorgeous Gorse Hill whose mission is to make the area gorgeous for its residents through public art and gardening among other things. It’s a great idea. Stretford is not in its self a thing of natural beauty. Stacey and I have a running joke of singing the Dallas theme tune as we drive along Chester Road past Harry Ramsden’s, Tesco Extra, White City Retail Park etc. But what the area has in spades is a good sense of community (as anyone on the Stretford M32 Facebook group knows). People like it here and they’re interested in helping each other out and making it a nice place to live. So the murals, fruit trees in big pots, and mosaic tiles on concrete bollards give it a quirky, friendly feel.

#shepherdspurse #Stretford #Manchester #UrbanFlora #botany

I thought I could satisfy my own project needs and add a little to suburb’s quirkiness by having a go at producing a complete flora of the walls, gutters and random green places of Gorse Hill.

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Gorse Hill (more or less)

It’s less than a couple of square kilometers. Mostly residential streets but with a sprinkling of other curiosities from parks to allotments to industrial estates, and my personal favorite, the Bridgewater Canal no less! Enough to make it ambitious but not so much that it’s implausible. I imagine it’ll be fun, and that it’ll be useful in ways that are yet to occur to me. And without a deadline there’s no pressure on time, it can take as long as it takes.

#cowslip #BridgewaterCanal #Stretford #Manchester #UrbanFlora #botany

As of right now that’s all I’ve got. Next step is to think about logistics. What will I need? How should I go about it? Is this kind of thing already happening anywhere else? These aren’t rhetorical questions by the way I’d genuinely like your opinion! All comments and suggestions welcome. Planning blog to follow…

Thanks for reading.